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BillJacobs (44K)

Test Your Slam Play


from Bill Jacobs

bill.jacobs55@gmail.com

A K 8 3 2
6 5
A K 7 6 4
6
N
WE
S
7 4
A K
8 3 2
K Q J 10 9 4
WestNorthEastSouth
2 *2 Pass3 
Pass3 Pass6 NT**
PassPassPass 
6 NT by South

* Weak two opening
** wearing rose-coloured glasses

West leads HJ. Plan the play.


Solution

West Deals
Both Vul
A K 8 3 2
6 5
A K 7 6 4
6
Q 5
J 10 9 8 3 2
J 5
A 8 5
N
WE
S
J 10 9 6
Q 7 4
Q 10 9
7 3 2
7 4
A K
8 3 2
K Q J 10 9 4

You have 11 tricks (5 clubs and three sets of ace-king) and one certain loser in the CA. The twelfth trick can only come from a squeeze in spades and diamonds - the two suits in which you hold threat cards.

Who is the squeezee? It will have to be East, as West cannot have enough cards in spades and diamonds, given the weak two opening. This presents a problem, as East will be discarding after dummy when you run the club suit.

You must organise your D8 as a threat card. The only hope for the contract is to cash the DAK at tricks 2 and 3 (technically a Vienna Coup) and then play on clubs. You hope that West wins CA and is out of diamonds. Win the heart return and run the clubs. When the last club is cashed, as in the diagram below, East is squeezed:

A K 8 3
x x x x
N
WE
S
J 10 9
Q
7 4
8
4

It looks weird to establish your opponents' diamond trick before knocking out the CA, but if the defence takes the setting trick in diamonds when in with CA, you could never have made the contract anyway.

The moral: If you overbid, you have to over-play.



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