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The Hans G Rosendorff Memorial Women's Swiss Pairs


By Marnie Leybourne

There were some wildly distributional hands at the Hans Rosendorff this year with a lot of high level decisions to make. I was playing with Leone Fuller and our first hand of the event seemed to set the tone of the weekend:

East Deals
Both Vul
♠ A Q 9 5
9 6 3
2
♣ A 10 6 4 2
♠ 10 2
A 10 4 2
4
♣ K Q J 9 7 5
N
WE
S
♠ J 8
K Q J 8 7 5
A J 6
♣ 8 3
♠ K 7 6 4 3

K Q 10 9 8 7 5 3
♣ —

How often do you pick up a hand with an eight/five distribution? The bidding at our table was fairly simple. East opened 1H, South bid 5D (intending to show spades if given another opportunity), West bid 5H and North doubled. South now felt obliged to pass and the contract went one off for +200 to N/S.

This was a popular result, replicated at five tables. Two pairs were in 5H undoubled making 10 tricks, one in 5Hx making only nine tricks and four in 4H, three making and one going one off. It is fairly extraordinary that South would let anyone play in 4H holding those eight diamonds!

At the remaining 7 tables, N/S played in 6Dx (-1), 5S (making 12 or 13 tricks), 5Sx (12 tricks) and 6Sx (making).

Round two

One of the most interesting hands of the event came in round 2. We were the only pair to reach 6D and were the only pair in the women's field that made the 12 tricks that deep finesse says is there (Meredith Goodlet and Jennifer Andrews made 12 tricks in the restricted field). In fact, in the women's field of six pairs in 5D, only two made 11 tricks (the rest made 10). Two pairs were in 5Cx (off one or two). At the other tables, where all pairs made nine or 10 tricks, the contracts were 4H, 5H, 6Hx, 4S, and 5S. There was one pair in 3S and one in 3H. Again, how are people letting pairs buy the hands at such a low level? The hand is shown below (rotated for convenience):

East Deals
N-S Vul
♠ A
2
8 6 3 2
♣ A J 8 7 5 4 2
♠ K 9 8 5 4 3
A 9 8 6 4
7
♣ Q
N
WE
S
♠ Q 10 7
K Q 7 3
J 9
♣ K 10 6 3
♠ J 6 2
J 10 5
A K Q 10 5 4
♣ 9
WestNorthEastSouth
Pass2 ♣
3 ♣4 NTPass5
PassPass5 Pass
Pass6 ♣Dbl6
PassPassPass

2C (10-14, either single suited minor or both minors)
3C (both majors)
4NT pick a minor)
6C (pass or correct)

The heart Ace was led, followed by the club Queen at trick two. The club Ace won the trick and another club was played, ruffed with the Ace of diamonds. The diamond King and Queen were played, removing trumps. Now, there were two trumps left in dummy and the spade Ace, giving three entries to dummy so that two more rounds of clubs could be ruffed, setting the suit up.

Granted, the double of 5C alerted us to the potential adverse club distribution, however this is a contract that the whole field should be making, particularly as the lead was generally either the heart Ace or the club Queen.

Being a wimp

The next hand from round five had 16 different contracts/results in 20 tables. Only four results were replicated! There were three tables in 4 or 5H, three tables in 3 or 4S with the rest in diamond contracts. Eight were in 5D and two in each of 4D, 3D and 2D (sometimes played by North and sometimes by South). This appears to be very wimpish bidding on the part of some pairs.

However, the real wimp I am discussing here is me. Holding the North cards, we pushed our opposition to 5H and I didn't double. It was politely suggested that I grow a pair when this contract went three light for +300 our way rather than +800.

North Deals
None Vul
♠ A J 5 2
J 7 6 5
7 6 2
♣ J 6
♠ K Q 9 6
A K 10 4
K
♣ K Q 8 3
N
WE
S
♠ 8 7 4 3
Q 9 3 2
9 8 3
♣ 10 7
♠ 10
8
A Q J 10 5 4
♣ A 9 5 4 2

Round six

The first hand on day two was another high level judgement, and nine of the 20 tables bid to slam (one bid and made 7C from West). One West was in 3S, which must have been an early morning stuff-up.

North Deals
None Vul
♠ J 5 4 2
K 8 6 4 3
6 2
♣ 10 6
♠ K
J 7 2
A 10 8 5
♣ A K J 8 4
N
WE
S
♠ A 10 8
A
K J 9 4 3
♣ Q 9 5 2
♠ Q 9 7 6 3
Q 10 9 5
Q 7
♣ 7 3
WestNorthEastSouth
Pass2 ♣Pass
2 ♠Pass3 ♣Pass
3 Pass3 NTPass
4 Pass4 Pass
5 Pass6 Pass
PassPass

The bidding at our table (with N/S silent) was:

2C (10-14 points, either single suited minor or at least 5/4 either way in the minors)
2S (game force), somewhat disbelieving the opening bid
3C (both minors)
3D (relay)
3NT (four clubs, five or more diamonds)
4D (Keycard), still excited by the double fit
4H (0 or 3)
5D (to play if 0)
6D (3)

Play was easy. With the diamond queen dropping, 13 tricks were there.

The third hand of this set was another highly competitive hand with 12 different contracts/results in 20 tables. 5S by South (doubled or undoubled) was the most popular contract (eight times). A further four pairs were pushed to 6S (doubled twice). Most made 10 tricks.

The remaining eight pairs were in either 6D or 6H (one in 7Dx), sometimes doubled, making either 11 or 13 tricks. I expect several Easts bid to slam on the basis of their spade void, not realising that their partner also had a spade void!

South Deals
None Vul
♠ Q J 8 6 5 4 3
6
10 8
♣ 9 4 3
♠ —
7 5 3
A K 9 7 6 5
♣ J 7 5 2
N
WE
S
♠ —
A K J 10 9 8 2
Q J 4 2
♣ Q 8
♠ A K 10 9 7 2
Q 4
3
♣ A K 10 6
WestNorthEastSouth
1 ♠
3 4 ♠5 Pass
Pass5 ♠6 Dbl
PassPassPass

Leone, sitting East, didn't bother telling anyone about her excellent side suit, and bid 6D anticipating that it was less likely that North would have AK of clubs (as South opened the bidding). She felt this was an 11 or 13 trick hand and she was right. North, understandably, led her singleton heart (knowing a spade was useless) and 13 tricks rolled home.

Round nine

The final hand of the competition, board 12 of round nine, wasn't so distributional. However, I'm including it as I finally found that pair I had been lacking and sitting North managed to double West's 4D contract.

West Deals
None Vul
♠ 10 9 6 5
A K 9 3
Q J 10
♣ 10 2
♠ 8 4
Q 6 5
A 4 3 2
♣ K Q J 7
N
WE
S
♠ K Q
J 10 7 2
K 9 7 6
♣ 9 8 4
♠ A J 7 3 2
8 4
8 5
♣ A 6 5 3
WestNorthEastSouth
1 Pass1 1 ♠
2 3 Pass3 ♠
PassPass4 Pass
PassDblPassPass
Pass

3H (cue raise)

The double was a no brainer, as Leone could have at most two hearts given the bidding, so we were "sure" to take AK of hearts, a heart ruff and a diamond. This didn't even include what she should have for her 1S overcall and she duly contributed her two Aces, setting the contract by three for +500. This gave us nine imps, and we won that match by nine imps.



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