Need a website? Free website templates by professional designers at WTO.
 

A Dangerous Double


From Fiske Warren

This interesting hand was played at WABC earlier in the year.

East Deals
Both Vul
A K 7 3
K Q 7 5
K 8 5 2
J
8 6 5 2
6
Q J 10 7
Q 8 4 3
N
WE
S
Q J 10 9 4
10 9 8 4 2
9 5 2
A J 3
A 9 6 4 3
A K 10 7 6

Bidding:

WestNorthEastSouth
  Pass1 
Pass1 Pass2 
Pass3 NTPass4 
Pass5 Pass6 
DblPassPassRdbl
PassPassPass 
6 ×× by South

Some of the North-South's bidding looks debatable but the final contract of 6D seems very reasonable - until one sees the 4-0 trump break. West could not resist doubling but this was ill-advised because it gave the opponents a chance to remove to 6NT as well as pin-pointing the diamond position. South decided to go for broke by redoubling.

West led his singleton heart, won by declarer's Jack. Declarer now led a small diamond, intending to finesse D8 in dummy. West, however, foiled this plan by playing D10, forcing dummy to win with DK.

West sat back, waiting to make his two "certain" trumps tricks with DQJ sitting over declarer's Ace. It didn't quite turn out that way...

Declarer cashed CAK, discarding a heart from dummy and then ruffed a club. Next came SAK, discarding HA3 from hand, followed by a spade ruff.

This was now the position:

7
K Q
8 5
8
Q J 7
Q
N
WE
S
Q J
10 9 8
A 9 6
10 7

Declarer continued with C7, ruffed with dummy's D5 and then S7 ruffed in hand with 6D. West had to follow suit all the way and was now left with just DQJ7. Declarer continued with C10 and West had to ruff with DJ to prevent D8 winning in dummy. But West was now end-played, forced to concede the last two tricks by leading from DQ7 round to declarer's DA9.

South was thankful for his score of +1830 and especially grateful to his partner for providing the vital D8.



EDITING OF MATERIAL

Contributors should note that the right to modify submitted material is retained by the Editors.